Blog

The Coastal Resilience of NYC (II)
May 28, 2018 — Kyle Haynes

[In Part I of this four-part series, Virginia Tech's Executive Master of Natural Resources (XMNR) alumni, environmental consultant, and sustainability professional Kyle Haynes began a conversation on the need for and reasons behind efforts to improve New York City's coastal resilience. In this installment, Haynes reviews the impacts of recent hurricanes in NYC, and explores what is required to build a stronger, more resilient city] Hurricane Sandy's Impacts and the Need for Coastal Resilience New York City is home to more than 520 miles… Read More
A Disappearing Act? The Reefs of Vieques
May 24, 2018 — Alexandra Novotny

The coral reefs surrounding Vieques have been subject to many destructive activities over the past few decades. After years of military exercises, large swaths of coral have been destroyed and are trying to recover. Current issues such as warming waters, strong hurricanes, and human impact are hindering progress and making matters worse. Without a plan for conservation and restoration, the reefs of Vieques may face a dim future. Similar to Puerto Rico, Vieques has extensive reef coverage offshore. Locals in… Read More
The Coastal Resilience of NYC (I)
May 21, 2018 — Kyle Haynes

[In Part I of this four-part series, Virginia Tech's Executive Master of Natural Resources (XMNR) alumni, environmental consultant, and sustainability professional Kyle Haynes begins a conversation on the need for and reasons behind efforts to improve New York City's coastal resilience.] On October 29th, 2012, Hurricane Sandy hit New York City tragically killing 44 New Yorkers and causing over $19 billion in damages and economic losses. Entire neighborhoods were destroyed, more than 88,000 building were flooded, 23,000 businesses were impacted, and infrastructure throughout… Read More
Chesapeake Bay Community-Based Public-Private Partnership (CBP3)
May 17, 2018 — Elizabeth Hurley

Last month (April 2018), thirty-one interdisciplinary professionals enrolled in Virginia Tech’s Executive Master of Natural Resources (XMNR) graduate degree program gathered for their fourth meeting of the year. Their focus: how to manage stormwater in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The United Nations (UN) reports that approximately 2 billion people, one-fifth of the world’s population, live in areas of water scarcity. Increased demand and climate change are poised to make water increasingly scarce. The impacts of this are varied, jeopardizing food and… Read More
Humanity’s Plastic Footprint (IV)
May 14, 2018 — Gail Kulisch

[Gail Kulisch, a Virginia Tech Executive Master of Natural Resources (XMNR) alumni and an environmental consultant with experience in marine pollution and remediation. In Part I of this four-part series, Kulisch introduced the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and its impact; in Part II she discussed what makes plastics such a persistent water problem; and Part III presents the path plastics take from production to accumulation in the world's oceans. In this final installment, Ms. Kulisch offers a discussion of the alternatives and initiatives for… Read More