• NR 5014 Constructing Sustainability (3 credits)

    This course examines the science, policy and practice of sustainability and sustainable development in a global context. We will examine the history, current status and future prospects of sustainability and sustainable development from economic, social and ecological perspectives. In the past several decades, sustainability and sustainable development have gained status in political, scientific, business, religious and cultural institutions and are now guiding principles that frame and shape public policy and private practice at multiple scales. While these concepts are well‐established in many communities and cultures worldwide, they have only recently emerged as prominent features in the mainstream of contemporary popular culture throughout global society. This interdisciplinary course encourages students to consider how they can engage science, policy, professional and civic institutions in constructing sustainability.

    Instructor(s):
    David P. Robertson
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5114 Global Issues in Natural Resources (3 credits)

    This course is designed to support the International Field Experience (IFE) scheduled for the same semester. It provides students with important global context for issues examined during the IFE, while also encouraging students to consider the challenges and rewards of working in a different culture. During the weeks prior to departure, students work online to complete a series of assignments and get to know the other members of their IFE team. Students will come together online again following completion of their field work to wrap-up and reflect on their experiences. Specific readings and assignments vary each semester according to the IFE destination and the lead IFE faculty.

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5194 Environmental Ethics (3 credits)

    A critical examination of the ethical dimensions of the embedded social, economic, and cultural constructs that shape both the causes and consequences of environmental problems. There is often a desire to oversimplify both the roots of current environmental crises as well as the possible responses; however, these issues are incredibly complex, in moral as well as in economic, political, and biological terms. This course puts the tension in context by examining diverse challenges, such as: overconsumption, pollution, resource conflicts, carrying capacity, food production, climate change, and environmental disaster through a philosophical lens. A special emphasis on responsibility and accountability will be used as a framework for analysis, asking questions about how to consider future generations, human/non-human relationships, and the impact of particular world-views on our ability to create a sustainable and secure future. Critical questions about implications for justice and equality will be included in the discussion. Finally, the course will assess both mainstream and alternative political methods of addressing environmental issues.

     

    Instructor(s):
    Jennifer Lawrence
    Offered:
    Fall, Winter
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5424 Urban Wildlife (3 credits)

    Eight of every ten of Americans live in cities or towns of 50,000 people or more, and 50% of the world’s human population now lives in urban areas. What has been the impact of this transition on wildlife populations? While it’s a common assumption that cities are inhospitable to non-human animal life, we have ample evidence today to indicate that not only do some wildlife species survive in urban areas; they can thrive. One positive consequence of this is that people can directly enjoy and appreciate wildlife close to home, and feel a closer connection to the natural world by doing so. A negative consequence is that conflicts between people and wildlife are on the rise. Urbanization has created new challenges for wildlife management professionals, and most have little or no special training in this area. This course will be organized into five learning units: urban landscapes, urban ecosystems, urban habitats and hazards, sociopolitical issues, and special management considerations.

    Instructor(s):
    Megan Draheim
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5634 Urban Ecology (3 credits)

    Our planet is increasingly urban. Approximately 50% of the world’s people now live in urban areas. In many regions of the world, the rate of urbanization is declining; however, individual cities, metropolitan regions, and urban areas continue to grow (in number, extent and population). In this context, urban ecology is an important approach to environmental science and sustainable development. People throughout the world practice urban ecology. These people are motivated by a desire to create healthy human ecosystems and livable communities in which to live, work, and play. This semester, we will study some of these people, projects, and places. Key questions: What is an urban ecosystem? Are cities sustainable environments? What are civic stakeholders, local communities, and global society doing to ensure that urban and urbanizing landscapes are healthy and desirable places for today’s world?

    Instructor(s):
    David P. Robertson
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5724 Conservation Ecology (3 credits)

    Human activities are having a cumulative effect on the natural systems upon which life depends. Future land management impacts will likely entail unprecedented change in environmental conditions. More integration of the traditional natural resources fields will be required to develop innovative approaches to sustain resource development. Conservation ecology provides insights to the many benefits and services that nature offers and explores strategies to sustain ecological integrity and plan landscapes for human use. It is an emerging interdisciplinary approach to harmonizing the interactions between people and nature at ecosystem scales.

    *Available in Fall, Spring, and Summer I (12 week, even numbered years)

    Instructor(s):
    Megan Draheim
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring, Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Adaptive Management (3 credits)

    Faced with limited resources to confront growing challenges, conservation organizations must show that their efforts are strategic, systematic, and results-oriented. This course provides students with the skills and knowledge to design and implement effective conservation projects and to generate clear evidence of their progress toward achieving conservation results. The course provides training in adaptive management (AM), including planning, monitoring, implementing, analyzing, learning from, and adapting conservation projects — essential knowledge and skills for current and emerging conservation practitioners. Graduate students in conservation-focused programs require experiential learning in the practical and applied processes (i.e. adaptive management) and skills (e.g. developing goals and objectives, budget drafting, and leadership) that are essential for achieving conservation results.

    Instructor(s):
    Heather E. Eves
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Biodiversity Policy (3 credits)

    *NEW* Conservation biologists warn that we are in the midst of a great “extinction crisis,” with millions of species threatened due to habitat destruction, climate change, and other anthropogenic factors.  This course focuses on examining how we are (and should be) constructing legal regimes and effective political institutions to conserve Earth’s endangered forms of life across multiple levels (ecosystem, landscape, species, population, and genetic diversity).  We will examine U.S. legal and political responses to biodiversity loss, with a focus on the Endangered Species Act, as well as the role of international law, especially treaty regimes.  We will look at how law is(n’t) succeeding in preserving life on Earth, and pay particular attention to most effective legal practices to conserve biodiversity.

    Instructor(s):
    Michael Ruggiero
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Biodiversity Stewardship (3 credits)

    This course builds on the principles of biodiversity science across the many components of stewardship. Participants will each identify a study area (local site or area, a county, or larger region) that provides the context for investigating, documenting, analyzing and promoting biodiversity.   Accordingly, students’ projects and course products are highly variable and reflect a wide variety of professional, academic and personal interests.  Skills developed in this course can be immediately applied to real-world needs, and some participants may design their projects and products to address an existing need.

    Instructor(s):
    Jim Egenrieder
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Changing Environmental Values (3 credits)

    People value the natural environment for many reasons, and many intellectual ideas serve as the basis for an environmental ethic. Additionally, values and ethics change over time, influenced by diverse factors, including culture, economic conditions, and popular discourse.  These values and ethics are important in determining how we ultimately relate to and manage our natural environment. Students will: 1) explore the range of global environmental values and ethics; 2) analyze how differences in values and ethics inform how environmental issues are addressed; and 3) examine strategies for communicating across difference in environmental values.

    Instructor(s):
    Kimberly Coleman
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
  • NR 5884 Climate Change Policy (3 credits)

    *NEW* This course focuses on institutional responses to climate change at the international, national and sub-national levels, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol, and U.S. climate policymaking under the Clean Air Act and state and regional initiatives. Both mitigation and adaptation approaches will be addressed, as well as climate geoengineering.

    Instructor(s):
    Adam Kalkstein
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Climate Change Science (3 credits)

    As average global temperatures continue to rise, it is imperative to not only understand the science behind climate change, but also its potential ramifications and impacts. Using scientific research, this course begins by exploring the why, how, and when behind climate change. Contemporary readings will be used to spark discussion and debate surrounding the potential implications of climate change, with topics ranging from natural disasters to human health. The course will culminate in a “Congressional Briefing” students will prepare synthesizing their knowledge of the subject, as well as proposing a political solution.

    Instructor(s):
    Adam Kalkstein
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Coastal & Marine Systems (3 credits)

    Approximately 3 billion people, or half of the world’s population, live within 200 kilometers of a coastline. That figure is projected to increase dramatically by 2025. Coastal areas represent complex socio-ecological systems that provide valuable ecosystem services to people and the planet, but these ecosystems are under increasing stress with growing coastal urbanization and other anthropocentric impacts and demands. Coastal management is concerned with protecting, conserving, and managing coasts and coastal resources and requires an interdisciplinary approach to understanding and negotiating often-competing interests. In this course, we will be exploring the socio-ecological systems that comprise coastal areas or zones, as well as the pressures affecting their health and resilience. We will then examine some strategies being developed around the world to manage coastal areas for social, economic, and environmental sustainability.

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Communication & Influence (3 credits)

    The ability to communicate persuasively and effectively impacts one’s ability to accomplish individual objectives, contribute as a valuable member of a team, lead and manage others, and collaborate within and across organizations. It is a fundamental component of all social and environmental change. This course will introduce basic professional communications best practices and enable students to craft a personalized plan to develop targeted competencies. Students will have access to one-on-one career coaching with the professor.

    Instructor(s):
    Emily Talley
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Environmental Forensics (3 credits)

    *NEW* Students in this skills-based course will collect, examine, and analyze information about current environmental challenges to develop research, critical thinking, and communication skills applicable to a variety of resource-related professions. Students gain a more nuanced and holistic competence in handling environmental and sustainability topic components, such as: stakeholders goals, expectations, and behaviors; identification of cross-sector and confounding factors; and evaluating the effectiveness of existing response efforts.

    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Course Syllabus Coming Soon
  • NR 5884 Food Policy & Sustainability (3 credits)

    How do politics and policy shape food and agricultural systems from “farm to fork”, including, production, regulation, distribution, sale and consumption? How is food connected to conservation and sustainability? What is the relationship between domestic agricultural systems, foreign policy, and international aid and trade? Why has there been an explosion in local, organic and free trade movements? This course will explore the structure of a globalized food landscape, with a focus on public and private decision‐makers from government and industry to relief and development organizations. We will analyze the economic, ecological, and social dimensions of food and farming policy on contemporary urban and rural issues, such as climate change, land use & livelihoods, biotechnology, national security and political instability, trade and subsidies, and human health.

     

    Instructor(s):
    Jennifer Jones
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Human-Wildlife Conflicts (3 credits)

    Human-wildlife conflict resolution is a rapidly growing area within the wildlife sciences that draws upon the need for multi-disciplinary approaches to resolve complex issues associated with human domination of ecosystems. The problems people have with wild animals and the problems wild animals have with people require the use of cooperative, collaborative, and innovative approaches if they are to be resolved in ways that maximize both social and ecological benefits. Nowhere do the challenges in this area loom larger than in our urban and suburban environments. Within very recent times the growing conflicts between people and wild animals such as beaver, deer, coyote and Canada geese have developed to a point where the entire paradigm of wildlife management has been changed. This course draws upon some of the emerging issues associated with human-wildlife conflicts and through the use of case histories and examples explore the theory and practice of conflict resolution as well as the practical ethics needed to navigate contemporary wildlife management.

    Instructor(s):
    Megan Draheim
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Infrastructure for Resilience (3 credits)

    Infrastructure describes the basic systems and structures that support markets, governance, communication, lifestyle, and every other aspect of society.  Infrastructure includes physical or “hard” infrastructure systems such as transportation, energy, water/ sanitation, and one that is often left out of the planning mix, ecological systems; as well as “soft” infrastructure systems – the less tangible systems such as laws, regulations, markets, research and education, etc. that ultimately affect the design, construction, management, and governance of these systems.  In an era experiencing profound change including rapid urbanization, changing climatic conditions, as well as shifting poles of power, the vulnerabilities of existing infrastructure systems are becoming more apparent.  Cities, often in partnership with private interests, are at the vanguard of an infrastructure revolution. Through rethinking systems, and their management and impacts, cities are leading the way towards a more resilient and sustainable future through infrastructure development that advances ecosystem services, energy efficiency and renewable resource use, enhanced and efficient water and sanitation systems, novel waste management strategies, as well as the governance, market, and management systems to support them. In this course, we will explore these infrastructure innovations and how professions are shifting to design, support, implement, and manage a new landscape.

    Instructor(s):
    Courtney E. Kimmel
    Offered:
    Fall, Winter
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 International Environmental Law & Policy (3 credits)

    International environmental law has been perhaps the most dynamic sector of international law over the past 30 years, growing from a mere handful of agreements 30 years ago, focused primarily on pollution of the marine environment and the conservation of migratory birds and marine mammals, to over 700 agreements today, addressing a multitude of serious environmental issues, including depletion of the climate change, ozone layer, regulation of trade in endangered species and prevention of transboundary air pollution. Additionally, there has been steadily increasing impetus for expanding the purview of international environmental law, including causes of action for transboundary environmental harm and recognition of the rights of future generations to a healthy environment. This course will seek to provide an overview of the status of international environmental law in the 21st Century, including the sources of international law, mechanisms to assess and facilitate implementation of and compliance with international environmental law, and assessment of effectiveness of international environmental law and methods to enhance its effectiveness.

    Instructor(s):
    Jennifer Wills
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring
  • NR 5884 Landscape Systems and Strategies (3 credits)

    The cumulative effects of global trends such as increasing population, expanding cities, improving living standards, accelerating climate change, shifting agriculture, and moving coastlines combine with local pressures on individual landscapes.  Over the next century, these keystone processes will fundamentally alter landscapes across the globe creating new challenges for productivity, sustainability, resilience, and adaptability.  Landscapes are definable frames of human activities and natural systems, ranging from highly altered, such as urban or agricultural lands, to predominately natural, such as wild or resource lands.  We rely on landscape organization for essential social and ecosystem services.  The imperative for sustainability requires that we develop conservation, development, and governance processes that treat landscapes with a long view.  This course looks at the big picture, by examining the challenge of planning large landscapes for both the intermediate and long term.  The objective is to construct a vision for unseen, yet sustainable, landscapes.

    *Available in Fall, Spring, and Summer I (12 week, on odd-numbered years)

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring, Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Sustainability Case Studies (3 credits)

    Those of us who are passionate about the environment and sustainability issues often think first about solving problems in far corners of the globe. Examining our own neighborhoods, cities, and regions, can provide insights into the challenges of sustainability on a global scale. Each student will investigate the place where s/he lives and use the information gathered to develop a case study illustrating an important aspect of sustainability. This class provides opportunities to: learn from and draw upon insights from the perspectives and experiences of fellow students and to practice creative thinking, writing, and research skills as we analyze their communities’ connection and interaction with natural resource systems, such as water, food and agriculture, climate, and energy.

    Instructor(s):
    Andrew Perlstein
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Transboundary Resource Management (3 credits)

    *NEW* Boundaries are created by humans to define ownership, sovereignty, and jurisdiction, as well as to confer rights, responsibilities, and accountability at all levels—individual, local, regional, national, and international. However, natural resource systems do not conform to and are not contained by political, cultural, and economic boundaries, causing conflicts of varying scale. This course examines transboundary resource management through diverse lenses: global markets; state power; transnational communication and transportation systems; logistics and supply systems; resource royalties; and increasingly sophisticated and complicated international and transnational legal structures. Students will improve critical and creative thinking skills, as well as gain a more nuanced understanding of cultural, social, geographic, and political contexts.

    Instructor(s):
    Jennifer Lawrence , Courtney E. Kimmel
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Urban Water Systems (3 credits)

    *NEW * Water is the lifeblood of cities.  Freshwater, wastewater, and environmental water systems each provide vital services, and each can cause profound problems.  Citizens and industry need freshwater to live and function.  Without adequate wastewater management cities quickly become unhealthy, fetid places.  Imbalances in environmental water can cause degradation, drought, and fire or, conversely, catastrophic flooding.  This course examines urban water systems as an integrated management challenge. Case studies drawn from cities in North America and global regions experiencing rapid urbanization are used to identify emerging problems and prescribe best practices.

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
  • NR 5884 Water and Conflict (3 credits)

    *NEW*  Water is a vital resource to Earth’s 7 billion humans.  Only 3% of the Earth’s water is potable, and it is not evenly distributed around the world. Some countries have easy access to this resource, while others have too little or too much.  In this course, we’ll study the management of water resources in the U.S., Bangladesh and Kiribati, the Tigris-Euphrates Basin, and Brazil.  Students will be introduced to the basic issues surrounding water management, and then case studies will be used to investigate examples of water management and conflict around the world.

    Instructor(s):
    Desiree Di Mauro , Becky Patton
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Watershed Stewardship (3 credits)

    [formerly Watershed Systems Stewardship]  This course was developed as an interdisciplinary course covering: watershed identification and mapping; watershed characteristics and evaluation; stormwater engineering; stream corridor restoration; water quality monitoring; native plants and animals; exotic and invasive species; public education; volunteer coordination and training; roles and activities for teachers and students; and advocacy training.

    Instructor(s):
    Jim Egenrieder
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5954 Study Abroad, China Project (Fall 2016) (3 credits)

    Project details to be announced.
    Program Fee: 3 credit hours graduate tuition + $3300 project fee (covers lodging, in-country transportation, meals, translations services, etc.) + airfare.
    Prerequisite: NR5114 or approval by Dr. Kieran Lindsey

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Fall
  • NR 5954 Study Abroad, Indonesia Project (Summer 2017) (3 credits)

    Project details to be announced.

    Program Fee: 3 credit hours graduate tuition + $3300 project fee (covers lodging, in-country transportation, meals, translations services, etc.) + airfare.
    Prerequisite:
    NR5114 or approval by Dr. Kieran Lindsey

    Instructor(s):
    Marc Stern
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
  • NR 5954 Study Abroad, South Africa Project (Spring 2017) (3 credits)

    We explore and help stakeholder groups from the public, private, and civil society sectors advance innovative and collaborative ecological infrastructure initiatives to improve water quality and access in the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal Provinces of South Africa. As the wealthiest nation on the African continent, South Africa boasts modern cities, beautiful landscapes, and incredibly rich ecosystems; at the same time it struggles with crippling inequities as a relic of the apartheid era, and a dire water future.  But through promising cross-sector partnerships, the water future of South Africa is looking brighter.  Taking a holistic approach and considering South Africa’s social and economic inequities, many water initiatives are both addressing environmental conditions, as well as improving quality of life by advancing access to clean water and creating job and market opportunities for people who need it.

    Program Fee: 3 credit hours graduate tuition + $3300 project fee (covers lodging, in-country transportation, meals, translations services, etc.) + airfare.
    Prerequisite:
    NR5114 or approval by Dr. Kieran Lindsey

    Instructor(s):
    Holly Wise
    Offered:
    Spring
  • NR 5974 Independent Study (1-6 credits)

    Independent Study is designed for students who would like to work an individual project one-on-one with an assigned instructor or advisor. The course may be taken in the Fall, Spring, or Summer terms, depending on instructor availability, for 1-6 credits (3 is most common). Interested students need to schedule an advising appointment with Dr. Kieran Lindsey (klindsey@vt.edu) to discuss the proposed project and potential instructors.

    Instructor(s):
    Kieran Lindsey
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring, Summer I (12 weeks)