Infrastructure

InfrastructureInfrastructure systems weave the fabric on which society is organized and operates.  Particularly in urbanizing regions, planning, developing and managing for greater sustainability, resilience, and economic competitiveness means reconceptualizing infrastructure.  CLiGS is dedicated to building and sharing knowledge around the advancement of infrastructure systems that support sustainable forms of development.  CLiGS’ work focuses on issues including green and ecological infrastructure innovations, collaborative processes for developing community-scale energy plans, watershed-scale planning and management, and leadership for urban sustainability.

SpotlightsCoursesPeople


  • NR 5014 Constructing Sustainability (3 credits)

    This course examines the science, policy and practice of sustainability and sustainable development in a global context. We will examine the history, current status and future prospects of sustainability and sustainable development from economic, social and ecological perspectives. In the past several decades, sustainability and sustainable development have gained status in political, scientific, business, religious and cultural institutions and are now guiding principles that frame and shape public policy and private practice at multiple scales. While these concepts are well‐established in many communities and cultures worldwide, they have only recently emerged as prominent features in the mainstream of contemporary popular culture throughout global society. This interdisciplinary course encourages students to consider how they can engage science, policy, professional and civic institutions in constructing sustainability.

    Instructor(s):
    David P. Robertson
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5634 Urban Ecology (3 credits)

    Our planet is increasingly urban. Approximately 50% of the world’s people now live in urban areas. In many regions of the world, the rate of urbanization is declining; however, individual cities, metropolitan regions, and urban areas continue to grow (in number, extent and population). In this context, urban ecology is an important approach to environmental science and sustainable development. People throughout the world practice urban ecology. These people are motivated by a desire to create healthy human ecosystems and livable communities in which to live, work, and play. This semester, we will study some of these people, projects, and places. Key questions: What is an urban ecosystem? Are cities sustainable environments? What are civic stakeholders, local communities, and global society doing to ensure that urban and urbanizing landscapes are healthy and desirable places for today’s world?

    Instructor(s):
    David P. Robertson
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Landscape Systems and Strategies (3 credits)

    The cumulative effects of global trends such as increasing population, expanding cities, improving living standards, accelerating climate change, shifting agriculture, and moving coastlines combine with local pressures on individual landscapes.  Over the next century, these keystone processes will fundamentally alter landscapes across the globe creating new challenges for productivity, sustainability, resilience, and adaptability.  Landscapes are definable frames of human activities and natural systems, ranging from highly altered, such as urban or agricultural lands, to predominately natural, such as wild or resource lands.  We rely on landscape organization for essential social and ecosystem services.  The imperative for sustainability requires that we develop conservation, development, and governance processes that treat landscapes with a long view.  This course looks at the big picture, by examining the challenge of planning large landscapes for both the intermediate and long term.  The objective is to construct a vision for unseen, yet sustainable, landscapes.

    *Available in Summer I during odd number years

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring, Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Coastal & Marine Systems (3 credits)

    *NEW* Approximately 3 billion people, or half of the world’s population, live within 200 kilometers of a coastline. That figure is projected to increase dramatically by 2025. Coastal areas represent complex socio-ecological systems that provide valuable ecosystem services to people and the planet, but these ecosystems are under increasing stress with growing coastal urbanization and other anthropocentric impacts and demands. Coastal management is concerned with protecting, conserving, and managing coasts and coastal resources and requires an interdisciplinary approach to understanding and negotiating often-competing interests. In this course, we will be exploring the socio-ecological systems that comprise coastal areas or zones, as well as the pressures affecting their health and resilience. We will then examine some strategies being developed around the world to manage coastal areas for social, economic, and environmental sustainability.

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
  • NR 5884 Infrastructure for Resilience (3 credits)

    As a burgeoning movement in the conservation, development, and planning fields, green (and blue) infrastructure refers to the formal recognition and integration of natural and green spaces, as well as green technologies, into comprehensive planning and design processes as a means to ensure the provision of ecosystem services to surrounding areas. Ranging from site-scale strategies such as green roofs for managing stormwater, to regional networks of riparian corridors, green infrastructure planning and design presents many opportunities and challenges for planners, policy and decision makers, scientists and researchers, landowners, and taxpayers across the urban-rural gradient. This course explores the broader contexts which have given rise to green infrastructure planning and design both in the US and internationally, identifies and examines different critical scales for conceptualizing green infrastructure and practical strategies being employed at each scale, and compares policy goals and programs supporting green infrastructure in the US.

    Instructor(s):
    Courtney E. Kimmel
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Watershed Systems Stewardship (3 credits)

    This course was developed as an interdisciplinary course covering: watershed identification and mapping; watershed characteristics and evaluation; stormwater engineering; stream corridor restoration; water quality monitoring; native plants and animals; exotic and invasive species; public education; volunteer coordination and training; roles and activities for teachers and students; and advocacy training.

    Instructor(s):
    Jim Egenrieder
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus


Courtney Kimmel
Fellow, Assistant Director, Faculty
Daniel Marcucci
Fellow, Faculty
Andrew Perlstein
Fellow, Asst. Director, Faculty