Markets

Efficiency gains, nor technological advances, nor clever marketing are enough to drive production and consumption to sustainable levels.  It will require reassessing and reinventing the way business is conducted in both the private and public sector.  Enterprise refers to a complicated undertaking that requires boldness and energy; CLiGS is interested in understanding and advancing enterprise that contributes to sustainability outcomes in its environmental, social, and economic sense.

Many enterprises are engaging in strategic planning and change management to improve their performance on a variety of sustainability metrics important to internal and external stakeholders. CLiGS focuses on the principles of organizational development and the rapidly evolving theory and practice of sustainable enterprise planning and management, including strategies and tactics of change management, stakeholder analysis and engagement, indicators and monitoring, transparency and accountability, communication, and, most of all, the leadership necessary to generate direction, alignment, and commitment for enterprise-wide change.

SpotlightsCoursesPeople


  • NR 5014 Constructing Sustainability (3 credits)

    This course examines the science, policy and practice of sustainability and sustainable development in a global context. We will examine the history, current status and future prospects of sustainability and sustainable development from economic, social and ecological perspectives. In the past several decades, sustainability and sustainable development have gained status in political, scientific, business, religious and cultural institutions and are now guiding principles that frame and shape public policy and private practice at multiple scales. While these concepts are well‐established in many communities and cultures worldwide, they have only recently emerged as prominent features in the mainstream of contemporary popular culture throughout global society. This interdisciplinary course encourages students to consider how they can engage science, policy, professional and civic institutions in constructing sustainability.

    Instructor(s):
    David P. Robertson
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5834 Ecological Economics (3 credits)

    This course provides a historical overview of various schools of economic thought, presents the major principles required to fuse ecology with economics, and helps students to analyze economic policies under the lens of ecological reality. Particular attention is paid to economic growth theory and policy as it pertains to the sustainability of human society and management of natural resources. This is a trans-disciplinary course, incorporating relevant principles and practices from political science, psychology, and physics in addition to ecology and economics. Students are not required to construct mathematical models. The course is organized in 4 modules (following an introductory session): 1) ecological principles; 2) economic principles; 3) integrating ecological and economic principles, and; 4) policy and political economy in relation to natural resources.

    Instructor(s):
    Brian Czech
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Food Policy & Sustainability (3 credits)

    How do politics and policy shape food and agricultural systems from “farm to fork”, including, production, regulation, distribution, sale and consumption? How is food connected to conservation and sustainability? What is the relationship between domestic agricultural systems, foreign policy, and international aid and trade? Why has there been an explosion in local, organic and free trade movements? This course will explore the structure of a globalized food landscape, with a focus on public and private decision‐makers from government and industry to relief and development organizations. We will analyze the economic, ecological, and social dimensions of food and farming policy on contemporary urban and rural issues, such as climate change, land use & livelihoods, biotechnology, national security and political instability, trade and subsidies, and human health.

    Instructor(s):
    Jennifer Jones
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Sustainability Case Studies (3 credits)

    Offered:
    Coming Soon


Selma Elouardighi
International Fellow
Senior Fellow
Phil Hummel
Associate
Senior Fellow
Holly Wise
Senior Fellow, Faculty
Sena Zorlu
International Fellow