Engagement Practices

As the Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability (CLiGS), we are particularly interested in helping people influence and mobilize decision-making towards more sustainable forms of development. To affect meaningful and lasting change, this form of leadership needs to come from all sectors and a wide-range of professions, disciplines, cultures, and ideologies, because sustainability challenges occur at the nexus of economic, ecological, and social systems.  Through our engagement, research, graduate and professional education programs, CLiGS builds capacity within individuals to be agents of change from within their organizations, communities, professions, and networks to strategically intervene and transform systems.  At the core of the practices and strategies CLiGS is advancing is collaboration and leadership for sustainable development.

  • NR 5014 Constructing Sustainability (3 credits)

    This course examines the science, policy and practice of sustainability and sustainable development in a global context. We will examine the history, current status and future prospects of sustainability and sustainable development from economic, social and ecological perspectives. In the past several decades, sustainability and sustainable development have gained status in political, scientific, business, religious and cultural institutions and are now guiding principles that frame and shape public policy and private practice at multiple scales. While these concepts are well‐established in many communities and cultures worldwide, they have only recently emerged as prominent features in the mainstream of contemporary popular culture throughout global society. This interdisciplinary course encourages students to consider how they can engage science, policy, professional and civic institutions in constructing sustainability.

    Instructor(s):
    David P. Robertson
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5044 Environmental Conservation & the American Landscape (3 credits)

    *NEW* [aka Changing Environmental Values]  People value the natural environment for many reasons, and many intellectual ideas serve as the basis for an environmental ethic. Additionally, values and ethics change over time, influenced by diverse factors, including culture, economic conditions, and popular discourse.  These values and ethics are important in determining how we ultimately relate to and manage our natural environment. Students will: 1) explore the range of global environmental values and ethics; 2) analyze how differences in values and ethics inform how environmental issues are addressed; and 3) examine strategies for communicating across difference in environmental values.

    Instructor(s):
    Kimberly Coleman
    Offered:
    Spring
  • NR 5194 Environmental Ethics (3 credits)

    A critical examination of the ethical dimensions of the embedded social, economic, and cultural constructs that shape both the causes and consequences of environmental problems. There is often a desire to oversimplify both the roots of current environmental crises as well as the possible responses; however, these issues are incredibly complex, in moral as well as in economic, political, and biological terms. This course puts the tension in context by examining diverse challenges, such as: overconsumption, pollution, resource conflicts, carrying capacity, food production, climate change, and environmental disaster through a philosophical lens. A special emphasis on responsibility and accountability will be used as a framework for analysis, asking questions about how to consider future generations, human/non-human relationships, and the impact of particular world-views on our ability to create a sustainable and secure future. Critical questions about implications for justice and equality will be included in the discussion. Finally, the course will assess both mainstream and alternative political methods of addressing environmental issues.

     

    Instructor(s):
    Jennifer Lawrence
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5854 Natural Resources Communications Applications (3 credits)

    *NEW* [aka Communication & Influence] The ability to communicate persuasively and effectively impacts one’s ability to accomplish individual objectives, contribute as a valuable member of a team, lead and manage others, and collaborate within and across organizations. It is a fundamental component of all social and environmental change. This course will introduce basic professional communications best practices and enable students to craft a personalized plan to develop targeted competencies. Students will have access to one-on-one career coaching with the professor.

    Instructor(s):
    Emily Talley
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Environmental Forensics (3 credits)

    *NEW* Students in this skills-based course will collect, examine, and analyze information about current environmental challenges to develop research, critical thinking, and communication skills applicable to a variety of resource-related professions. Students gain a more nuanced and holistic competence in handling environmental and sustainability topic components, such as: stakeholders goals, expectations, and behaviors; identification of cross-sector and confounding factors; and evaluating the effectiveness of existing response efforts.
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Course Syllabus Coming Soon
  • NR 5884 International Environmental Law & Policy (3 credits)

    International environmental law has been perhaps the most dynamic sector of international law over the past 30 years, growing from a mere handful of agreements 30 years ago, focused primarily on pollution of the marine environment and the conservation of migratory birds and marine mammals, to over 700 agreements today, addressing a multitude of serious environmental issues, including depletion of the climate change, ozone layer, regulation of trade in endangered species and prevention of transboundary air pollution. Additionally, there has been steadily increasing impetus for expanding the purview of international environmental law, including causes of action for transboundary environmental harm and recognition of the rights of future generations to a healthy environment. This course will seek to provide an overview of the status of international environmental law in the 21st Century, including the sources of international law, mechanisms to assess and facilitate implementation of and compliance with international environmental law, and assessment of effectiveness of international environmental law and methods to enhance its effectiveness.

    Instructor(s):
    Wil Burns
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Sustainability Case Studies (3 credits)

    *NEW* Those of us who are passionate about the environment and sustainability issues often think first about solving problems in far corners of the globe. Examining our own neighborhoods, cities, and regions, can provide insights into the challenges of sustainability on a global scale. Each student will investigate the place where s/he lives and use the information gathered to develop a case study illustrating an important aspect of sustainability. This class provides opportunities to: learn from and draw upon insights from the perspectives and experiences of fellow students and to practice creative thinking, writing, and research skills as we analyze their communities’ connection and interaction with natural resource systems, such as water, food and agriculture, climate, and energy.

    Instructor(s):
    Andrew Perlstein
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Transboundary Resource Management (3 credits)

    *NEW* Boundaries are created by humans to define ownership, sovereignty, and jurisdiction, as well as to confer rights, responsibilities, and accountability at all levels—individual, local, regional, national, and international. However, natural resource systems do not conform to and are not contained by political, cultural, and economic boundaries, causing conflicts of varying scale. This course examines transboundary resource management through diverse lenses: global markets; state power; transnational communication and transportation systems; logistics and supply systems; resource royalties; and increasingly sophisticated and complicated international and transnational legal structures. Students will improve critical and creative thinking skills, as well as gain a more nuanced understanding of cultural, social, geographic, and political contexts.

    Instructor(s):
    Jennifer Lawrence , Courtney E. Kimmel
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Course Syllabus
Jerry Abrams
Senior Fellow
William Burns
Faculty
Dr. Bruce Hull
Senior Fellow; Faculty
Courtney Kimmel
Fellow, Faculty
Kieran Lindsey
Fellow; Associate Director of Online Programs
Michael Mortimer
Senior Fellow, Director, Faculty
Patty Raun
Fellow; Faculty
David Robertson
Senior Fellow, Faculty, and Associate Director of Executive Programs
Emily Talley
Senior Fellow; Faculty
Holly Wise
Senior Fellow, Faculty