Urban

UrbanAround 2010, we quietly crossed a threshold in the history of society in which more than half of the global population lived in urban areas. By 2050, between seven and eight out of every ten people living on Earth will be part of a city. Cities offer promising opportunities for innovation, efficiency, and improved quality of life that contribute to measures of development, but they also exert pressure on the systems that support them. Ecosystem services, food and water supply, energy delivery and consumption, waste and water management systems, and social infrastructure systems are all taxed as population and density increases, and need to be managed accordingly to ensure environmental sustainability and continued improvements in social conditions.

Taking a systems approach, CLiGS is exploring and advancing the interventions different stakeholders are deploying to affect the sustainability of urbanization as a process and the systems that support cities.

  • NR 5014 Constructing Sustainability (3 credits)

    This course examines the science, policy and practice of sustainability and sustainable development in a global context. We will examine the history, current status and future prospects of sustainability and sustainable development from economic, social and ecological perspectives. In the past several decades, sustainability and sustainable development have gained status in political, scientific, business, religious and cultural institutions and are now guiding principles that frame and shape public policy and private practice at multiple scales. While these concepts are well‐established in many communities and cultures worldwide, they have only recently emerged as prominent features in the mainstream of contemporary popular culture throughout global society. This interdisciplinary course encourages students to consider how they can engage science, policy, professional and civic institutions in constructing sustainability.

    Instructor(s):
    David P. Robertson
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5114 Global Issues in Natural Resources (3 credits)

    The purpose of this course is to build competencies in sustainability professionals to think globally about sustainability challenges and their career, to situate their own professional work in a global context, to better understand sustainability situations and tools for examining them, and to practice team/collaborative project management and problems solving skills. The course is organized into 4 broad areas of focus: the global Anthropocene, sustainability case analysis, leadership, and cultural competencies. This course is designed to support the International Field Experience (IFE) scheduled for the same semester.

    Instructor(s):
    Anamaria Bukvic , Selma Elouardighi , Bruce Hull , Kieran Lindsey , Daniel J. Marcucci , Marc Stern , Holly (Louise) Wise
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring, Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5424 Urban Wildlife (3 credits)

    Eight of every ten of Americans live in cities or towns of 50,000 people or more, and 50% of the world’s human population now lives in urban areas. What has been the impact of this transition on wildlife populations? While it’s a common assumption that cities are inhospitable to non-human animal life, we have ample evidence today to indicate that not only do some wildlife species survive in urban areas; they can thrive. One positive consequence of this is that people can directly enjoy and appreciate wildlife close to home, and feel a closer connection to the natural world by doing so. A negative consequence is that conflicts between people and wildlife are on the rise. Urbanization has created new challenges for wildlife management professionals, and most have little or no special training in this area. This course will be organized into five learning units: urban landscapes, urban ecosystems, urban habitats and hazards, sociopolitical issues, and special management considerations.

     

    Instructor(s):
    Megan Draheim
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5634 Urban Ecology (3 credits)

    Our planet is increasingly urban. Approximately 50% of the world’s people now live in urban areas. In many regions of the world, the rate of urbanization is declining; however, individual cities, metropolitan regions, and urban areas continue to grow (in number, extent and population). In this context, urban ecology is an important approach to environmental science and sustainable development. People throughout the world practice urban ecology. These people are motivated by a desire to create healthy human ecosystems and livable communities in which to live, work, and play. This semester, we will study some of these people, projects, and places. Key questions: What is an urban ecosystem? Are cities sustainable environments? What are civic stakeholders, local communities, and global society doing to ensure that urban and urbanizing landscapes are healthy and desirable places for today’s world?

    Instructor(s):
    David P. Robertson
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Coastal & Marine Systems (3 credits)

    Approximately 3 billion people, or half of the world’s population, live within 200 kilometers of a coastline. That figure is projected to increase dramatically by 2025. Coastal areas represent complex socio-ecological systems that provide valuable ecosystem services to people and the planet, but these ecosystems are under increasing stress with growing coastal urbanization and other anthropocentric impacts and demands. Coastal management is concerned with protecting, conserving, and managing coasts and coastal resources and requires an interdisciplinary approach to understanding and negotiating often-competing interests. In this course, we will be exploring the socio-ecological systems that comprise coastal areas or zones, as well as the pressures affecting their health and resilience. We will then examine some strategies being developed around the world to manage coastal areas for social, economic, and environmental sustainability.

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Human-Wildlife Conflicts (3 credits)

    Human-wildlife conflict resolution is a rapidly growing area within the wildlife sciences that draws upon the need for multi-disciplinary approaches to resolve complex issues associated with human domination of ecosystems. The problems people have with wild animals and the problems wild animals have with people require the use of cooperative, collaborative, and innovative approaches if they are to be resolved in ways that maximize both social and ecological benefits. Nowhere do the challenges in this area loom larger than in our urban and suburban environments. Within very recent times the growing conflicts between people and wild animals such as beaver, deer, coyote and Canada geese have developed to a point where the entire paradigm of wildlife management has been changed. This course draws upon some of the emerging issues associated with human-wildlife conflicts and through the use of case histories and examples explore the theory and practice of conflict resolution as well as the practical ethics needed to navigate contemporary wildlife management.

    Instructor(s):
    Megan Draheim
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Infrastructure for Resilience (3 credits)

    Infrastructure describes the basic systems and structures that support markets, governance, communication, lifestyle, and every other aspect of society.  Infrastructure includes physical or “hard” infrastructure systems such as transportation, energy, water/ sanitation, and one that is often left out of the planning mix, ecological systems; as well as “soft” infrastructure systems – the less tangible systems such as laws, regulations, markets, research and education, etc. that ultimately affect the design, construction, management, and governance of these systems.  In an era experiencing profound change including rapid urbanization, changing climatic conditions, as well as shifting poles of power, the vulnerabilities of existing infrastructure systems are becoming more apparent.  Cities, often in partnership with private interests, are at the vanguard of an infrastructure revolution. Through rethinking systems, and their management and impacts, cities are leading the way towards a more resilient and sustainable future through infrastructure development that advances ecosystem services, energy efficiency and renewable resource use, enhanced and efficient water and sanitation systems, novel waste management strategies, as well as the governance, market, and management systems to support them. In this course, we will explore these infrastructure innovations and how professions are shifting to design, support, implement, and manage a new landscape.

    Instructor(s):
    Courtney E. Kimmel
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Innovative Water Partnerships (3 credits)

    NEW!  This course will focus on financing and alternative project delivery in the water sector. Topics will range from technical aspects of the Clean and Drinking Water sectors, regulatory and legislative issues, funding and financing challenges and innovations in the water sector, and public-private partnerships. The basis of the course is an emerging platform known as the Community-Based Public-Private Partnership (CBP3) program (also known as the Community-Based Public-Private Performance Partnership (CBP4)) approach, which incorporates all aspects of the topics covered in this course.

    Instructor(s):
    Dominique Lueckenhoff , Seth Brown
    Offered:
    Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Landscape Systems and Strategies (3 credits)

    The cumulative effects of global trends such as increasing population, expanding cities, improving living standards, accelerating climate change, shifting agriculture, and moving coastlines combine with local pressures on individual landscapes.  Over the next century, these keystone processes will fundamentally alter landscapes across the globe creating new challenges for productivity, sustainability, resilience, and adaptability.  Landscapes are definable frames of human activities and natural systems, ranging from highly altered, such as urban or agricultural lands, to predominately natural, such as wild or resource lands.  We rely on landscape organization for essential social and ecosystem services.  The imperative for sustainability requires that we develop conservation, development, and governance processes that treat landscapes with a long view.  This course looks at the big picture, by examining the challenge of planning large landscapes for both the intermediate and long term.  The objective is to construct a vision for unseen, yet sustainable, landscapes.

    *Available in Fall, Spring, and Summer I (12 week, on odd-numbered years)

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring, Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Sustainability Case Studies (3 credits)

    Those of us who are passionate about the environment and sustainability issues often think first about solving problems in far corners of the globe. Examining our own neighborhoods, cities, and regions, can provide insights into the challenges of sustainability on a global scale. Each student will investigate the place where s/he lives and use the information gathered to develop a case study illustrating an important aspect of sustainability. This class provides opportunities to: learn from and draw upon insights from the perspectives and experiences of fellow students and to practice creative thinking, writing, and research skills as we analyze their communities’ connection and interaction with natural resource systems, such as water, food and agriculture, climate, and energy.

    Instructor(s):
    Jennifer Lawrence
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Urban Water Systems (3 credits)

    Water is the lifeblood of cities.  Freshwater, wastewater, and environmental water systems each provide vital services, and each can cause profound problems.  Citizens and industry need freshwater to live and function.  Without adequate wastewater management cities quickly become unhealthy, fetid places.  Imbalances in environmental water can cause degradation, drought, and fire or, conversely, catastrophic flooding.  This course examines urban water systems as an integrated management challenge. Case studies drawn from cities in North America and global regions experiencing rapid urbanization are used to identify emerging problems and prescribe best practices.

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5954 Study Abroad, China Project (Fall 2018) (3 credits)

    Hong Kong, on the Pearl River Estuary, is the engine that drives the world’s largest megacity, according to The World Bank. Yet three-quarters of it remains natural. Lying in the tropics, there are over 100 species of dragonflies in Hong Kong. Guilin, a provincial city 515 kilometers (320 mi) to the northwest, straddles the Li River, in the heart of one of the most iconic landscapes in the world. Industrialization, agriculture, development, and tourism all rely on this landscape. These two cities are the bases to explore 21st Century sustainability in one of the most dynamic and rapidly changing regions of the world.

    Program Fee: 3 credit hours graduate tuition + $3300 project fee (covers lodging, in-country transportation, meals, translations services, etc.) + airfare.

    IFE Travel Dates:  October 21-30, 2018

    Prerequisite: NR5114 or approval by Dr. Kieran Lindsey

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Fall
  • NR 5954 Study Abroad, Croatia Project (Summer 2018) (3 credits)

    Croatia is a small country with just under 5 million residents located in the southeastern Europe with diverse landscapes and rich history, cultural heritage, and traditions. Its exceptional natural environment is comprised of picturesque rolling hills, pristine forests, dramatic karst topography, mountain ridges, fertile plains, and interconnected system of rivers and lakes—all teeming with wildlife and endemic species. The country has eight national parks, including the National Park Plitvice, which features an ecologically distinctive system of 16 lakes and 92 waterfalls and was declared UNESCO’s heritage site in 1979. Croatian coastline along the Adriatic Sea, known as the ‘land of a thousand islands’ with the pristine beaches and crystal clear seawater, supports thriving finishing industry and tourism. The unique beauty of Croatian coastal settlements can be seen from the scenes of King’s Landing in the famous HBO’s TV series Game of Thrones filmed in the historic city of Dubrovnik.

    Program Fee: 3 credit hours graduate tuition + $3300 project fee (covers lodging, in-country transportation, meals, translations services, etc.) + airfare.

    IFE Travel Dates:  June 25 – July 4, 2018


    Prerequisite:
    NR5114 or approval by Dr. Kieran Lindsey

    Instructor(s):
    Anamaria Bukvic
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
  • NR 5954 Study Abroad, India Project (Spring 2018) (3 credits)

    With over a billion people moving into the global middle class over the next century, India’s decisions, successes, and failures will have global consequences, making India a game-changer in the worldwide struggle for sustainable development.  We will collaborate with partners to study source water protection projects in rapidly-developing Hyderabad, learn about water and sanitation in urban informal settlements, and travel to Delhi to visit with premier organizations addressing climate mitigation challenges in India.

    Program Fee: 3 credit hours graduate tuition + $3300 project fee (covers lodging, in-country transportation, meals, translations services, etc.) + airfare.

    IFE Travel Dates:  TBA


    Prerequisite:
    NR5114 or approval by Dr. Kieran Lindsey

    Instructor(s):
    Bruce Hull
    Offered:
    Spring
  • NR 5954 Study Abroad, Indonesia Project (Summer 2019) (3 credits)

    Travel with Professor Marc Stern to the Island of the Gods — Bali, Indonesia — to explore sustainability issues firsthand.  Bali, an island of temples, rice terraces, volcanoes, beaches, and reefs, is facing tremendous development pressures from a rapidly expanding international tourism industry and the demands that visitors place on local infrastructure and ecosystems.  We’ll explore some of Bali’s greatest challenges while also taking in its stunning cultural and natural beauty.  Critical areas of exploration may include how Bali is coping with both marine and land conservation issues in innovative ways.

    Program Fee: 3 credit hours graduate tuition + $3300 project fee (covers lodging, in-country transportation, meals, translations services, etc.) + airfare.

    IFE Travel Dates:  TBA

    Prerequisite: NR5114 or approval by Dr. Kieran Lindsey

    Instructor(s):
    Marc Stern
    Offered:
    Summer I (12 weeks)
  • NR 5954 Study Abroad, Morocco Project (Fall 2017) (3 credits)

    Situated on the northeastern tip of African continent where the Mediterranean Sea empties into the Atlantic, Morocco in some ways serves as a nexus of African, European, and the Middle Eastern markets and influence. This nexus has created interesting tensions for Morocco’s development agenda. Considered an Arab state by the United Nations, Morocco is at the same time faced with the challenges of an African developing nation, including high rates of urban migration and informal settlement, poverty, and malnutrition, while also working to maintain its competitive edge in a European-driven market. Governed as a constitutional monarchy that only established its independence from France a little over fifty years ago, Morocco is in a unique position to be quite intentional in its development trajectory – and it is.

    Program Fee: 3 credit hours graduate tuition + $3300 project fee (covers lodging, in-country transportation, meals, translations services, etc.) + airfare.

    IFE Travel Dates:  November 5-14, 2017


    Prerequisite:
    NR5114 or approval by Dr. Kieran Lindsey

    Instructor(s):
    Selma Elouardighi
    Offered:
    Fall
  • NR 5954 Study Abroad, South Africa Project (Spring 2019) (3 credits)

    We explore and help stakeholder groups from the public, private, and civil society sectors advance innovative and collaborative ecological infrastructure initiatives to improve water quality and access in the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal Provinces of South Africa. As the wealthiest nation on the African continent, South Africa boasts modern cities, beautiful landscapes, and incredibly rich ecosystems; at the same time it struggles with crippling inequities as a relic of the apartheid era, and a dire water future.  But through promising cross-sector partnerships, the water future of South Africa is looking brighter.  Taking a holistic approach and considering South Africa’s social and economic inequities, many water initiatives are both addressing environmental conditions, as well as improving quality of life by advancing access to clean water and creating job and market opportunities for people who need it.

    Program Fee: 3 credit hours graduate tuition + $3300 project fee (covers lodging, in-country transportation, meals, translations services, etc.) + airfare.

    IFE Travel Dates:  TBA


    Prerequisite:
    NR5114 or approval by Dr. Kieran Lindsey

    Instructor(s):
    Holly (Louise) Wise
    Offered:
    Spring
Faculty
Dr. Bruce Hull
Senior Fellow; Faculty
Courtney Kimmel
Fellow, Faculty
Fellow; Associate Director of Online Programs
Daniel Marcucci
Fellow, Faculty
Michael Mortimer
Senior Fellow, Founding Director, Faculty
David Robertson
Senior Fellow, Faculty, and Associate Director of Executive Programs