Water

Water

Water is the lifeblood of the planet. Even the United Nations acknowledges access to water as a human right – requisite to addressing all other human rights issues. As a fundamental element to life and so many aspects of society, ensuring an adequate supply and quality of water is critical to global security, human and economic development, and sustained ecosystem services.

CLiGS is exploring and advancing strategies and interventions different stakeholders are deploying to manage water resources at all scales. From transboundary resource management and governance strategies; to supply chain and production system reconfigurations; to the greening and expansion of water, wastewater, and drinking water infrastructure systems; to regulation, voluntary standards, and public-private partnerships, CLiGS is interested in how these practices and strategies are designed, negotiated, coordinated, and implemented to affect the sustainability of water resources for human, economic, and environmental health and wellbeing.

SpotlightsCoursesPeople


  • NR 5884 Climate Change Science (3 credits)

    As average global temperatures continue to rise, it is imperative to not only understand the science behind climate change, but also its potential ramifications and impacts. Using scientific research, this course begins by exploring the why, how, and when behind climate change. Contemporary readings will be used to spark discussion and debate surrounding the potential implications of climate change, with topics ranging from natural disasters to human health. The course will culminate in a “Congressional Briefing” students will prepare synthesizing their knowledge of the subject, as well as proposing a political solution.

    Instructor(s):
    Adam Kalkstein
    Offered:
    Spring, Summer I (6 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Climate Change Policy (3 credits)

    This course focuses on institutional responses to climate change at the international, national and sub-national levels, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol, and U.S. climate policymaking under the Clean Air Act and state and regional initiatives. Both mitigation and adaptation approaches will be addressed, as well as climate geoengineering.

    Instructor(s):
    Wil Burns
    Offered:
    Summer II (6 weeks)
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Coastal & Marine Systems (3 credits)

    Approximately 3 billion people, or half of the world’s population, live within 200 kilometers of a coastline. That figure is projected to increase dramatically by 2025. Coastal areas represent complex socio-ecological systems that provide valuable ecosystem services to people and the planet, but these ecosystems are under increasing stress with growing coastal urbanization and other anthropocentric impacts and demands. Coastal management is concerned with protecting, conserving, and managing coasts and coastal resources and requires an interdisciplinary approach to understanding and negotiating often-competing interests. In this course, we will be exploring the socio-ecological systems that comprise coastal areas or zones, as well as the pressures affecting their health and resilience. We will then examine some strategies being developed around the world to manage coastal areas for social, economic, and environmental sustainability.

    Instructor(s):
    Daniel J. Marcucci
    Offered:
    Summer I (6 weeks)
  • NR 5884 Green Infrastructure: Theory & Practice for Planning & Policy (3 credits)

    As a burgeoning movement in the conservation, development, and planning fields, green (and blue) infrastructure refers to the formal recognition and integration of natural and green spaces, as well as green technologies, into comprehensive planning and design processes as a means to ensure the provision of ecosystem services to surrounding areas. Ranging from site-scale strategies such as green roofs for managing stormwater, to regional networks of riparian corridors, green infrastructure planning and design presents many opportunities and challenges for planners, policy and decision makers, scientists and researchers, landowners, and taxpayers across the urban-rural gradient. This course explores the broader contexts which have given rise to green infrastructure planning and design both in the US and internationally, identifies and examines different critical scales for conceptualizing green infrastructure and practical strategies being employed at each scale, and compares policy goals and programs supporting green infrastructure in the US.

    Instructor(s):
    Courtney E. Kimmel
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 International Environmental Law & Policy (3 credits)

    International environmental law has been perhaps the most dynamic sector of international law over the past 30 years, growing from a mere handful of agreements 30 years ago, focused primarily on pollution of the marine environment and the conservation of migratory birds and marine mammals, to over 700 agreements today, addressing a multitude of serious environmental issues, including depletion of the climate change, ozone layer, regulation of trade in endangered species and prevention of transboundary air pollution. Additionally, there has been steadily increasing impetus for expanding the purview of international environmental law, including causes of action for transboundary environmental harm and recognition of the rights of future generations to a healthy environment. This course will seek to provide an overview of the status of international environmental law in the 21st Century, including the sources of international law, mechanisms to assess and facilitate implementation of and compliance with international environmental law, and assessment of effectiveness of international environmental law and methods to enhance its effectiveness.

    Instructor(s):
    Wil Burns
    Offered:
    Fall, Spring
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Watershed Systems Stewardship (3 credits)

    This course was developed as an interdisciplinary course covering: watershed identification and mapping; watershed characteristics and evaluation; stormwater engineering; stream corridor restoration; water quality monitoring; native plants and animals; exotic and invasive species; public education; volunteer coordination and training; roles and activities for teachers and students; and advocacy training.

    Instructor(s):
    Jim Egenrieder
    Offered:
    Fall
    Syllabus:
    Sample Course Syllabus
  • NR 5884 Transboundary Resource Management (3 credits)

    Offered:
    Coming Soon


Courtney Kimmel
Fellow, Assistant Director, Faculty
Associate